Court infringes on corporate faith

Jan 17th, 2013 | By
| Category: 2013-01-17, Opinion, Spring 2013, Top Headlines

As the mainstream media clouds our minds with fantasies of an apparent war on second-amendment freedoms, a different amendment is subtly being attacked– freedom of religion. This first-amendment right has undergone severe interpretation by the Supreme Court over the last few months, leaving certain religious fractions satisfied and others downtrodden.

 

Shouldn’t Christian business owners entail the same privileges as Muslim prisoners? While the Supreme Court ruled this past week in favor of allowing Muslim prisoners to gather for daily prayer, they have continuously ruled against allowing the Christian operated arts and crafts store, Hobby Lobby, from exempting a contraceptive coverage mandate, forcing the company to participate in that which contradicts their belief system.

 

This mandate demands that businesses pay for employee contraceptive, including the morning-after pill which is widely believed to induce an abortion. This violates the faith of Hobby Lobby proprietors. In response, Hobby Lobby has chosen to comply with their faith first and the law second. Thus, certain types of birth control will continue to not be provided through their company’s health insurance. The government has responded to this exertion of religious freedom by imposing an obnoxiously large fee of $1.3 million per day on the business.

 

This blatant act of contrasting principles by the government is an infringement on one’s freedom of religion. After all, both the individual and the corporation are granted first-amendment rights in the U.S.

 

Despite already owning over $14.3 million in fines, Hobby Lobby continues to endure the struggle. Being the largest company to file lawsuit against the contraceptive mandate, Hobby Lobby stands as an image of liberty. In addition, there are currently 40 other cases over the religious exemption aspects of the law currently before the courts–all filed by individuals fighting to preserve the sanctity of their rights as well.

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