NSA possesses new scary technology

Nov 21st, 2013 | By
| Category: 2013-11-21, Fall 2013, Opinion, Top Headlines, Web Exclusive

Written by: Taylor Stone

What if the U.S. government tracked every phone call you’ve ever made and every e-mail you’ve ever sent and stored them all on servers so large that it would require 1.7 million gallons of water each day just to keep the computers cool?

Unfortunately, this isn’t a trailer for the latest sci-fi movie; rather, it’s the rebirth of the National Security Agency, and it is already happening.

The NSA possesses the technology to confiscate the privacy of all Americans, and as a result of a top-secret court order by the administration requiring phone companies such as Verizon to hand over domestic phone records, the government agency is well on their way to doing just that.

Supporters of the NSA surveillance “scandal” have argued that the demanded phone records only require phone companies to turn over metadata, but there’s a lot that can be pieced together from knowing the phone numbers individuals have called and the general area where the call was made.

This is all happening under the guise of “national security.” Where are the search warrants? What happened to the Fourth Amendment?

In addition to gathering inconceivable amounts of information from American citizens not even suspected of criminal activity, the newest NSA data-gathering facility mildly named the “Utah Data Center” in Bluffdale, Utah could replace New York City as the newest target for a terrorism attack, reversing the very premise the agency claims to protect.

The Utah Data Center will basically be the “central nervous system” for the tracking and monitoring of all terrorist activities all over the world. Additionally, it will be the home for all of the metadata collected from monitoring (spying) on other countries including every citizen in the world’s phone calls and emails.

America would be left blind, isolated and defenseless if the Utah Data Center were destroyed or compromised. Just think of the type of secondary attack a potential terrorist could launch if our intel was down even for a few hours!

New York City was targeted because it is the financial hub for every single country in the world; it is “the world’s wallet.” Although our “wallet” got stolen on 9/11, we were able to figure out who took it within minutes because of our intelligence capabilities, right down to the identities of the hijackers.

Utah is basically the “spinal cord” because all of our body’s communications flow through it. Without intel, it’s “permanent paralysis” for the USA’s extremely ripped body. Wallets can be repaired or replaced, but once your back is broken you’ll never walk again, and the “big muscles” that everybody once feared will become useless.

The 1-million-square-foot facility is estimated to cost nearly $1.5 billion, and critics are claiming that the massive facility is just the latest attempt for the government organization to turn its ability to gather information on its own people, effectively stripping the American people of any reasonable expectation for privacy.

This type of extreme surveillance, filtering troves of data, will leave people with nowhere to hide, no secrets to have and none to keep. There will not be a whisper faint enough to hide from an NSA supercomputer.

The NSA has ascended on a path of turning the United States of America into the equal counterpart of a foreign nation simply to justify spying on millions of American citizens. Last time I checked, millions of Americans were not considered to be terrorists or a threat to national security.

 

 

 

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