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Reevaluate Quitting

 Money seems to be vanishing from your bank account. In desperate need of a job, you remember VSU has a Student Employment Web page on its site. You rush to your computer and search through several pages until you finally find something. Excited, you jump to apply, and after an extensive interview, you get the job.

 Feelings of nervousness and uneasiness seize you during the first couple of weeks. This “perfect” job turns out not to be so wonderful after all.

 When things tend to shift for the worst, people want to give up and move on to something else, something easier.

 Before you turn in your resignation, stop for a minute and think; why do you want to quit?

 Steve Langerud of DePauw University suggests identifying the problem before hitting the job-hunting pavements once again.

 Talk to your co-workers. See if they share the same feelings or deal with the same issues. If they do, they can give you pointers on surviving the job. Talking with others also helps establish relationships and those relationships will help you out through the tough times.

 Unfortunately, there will be those days that even wonderful co-workers cannot save you from. During those moments, you have to remind yourself why you wanted the job in the first place.

 When I got accepted to VSU, the issue of me not having a car came up; I would need a steady source of transportation between school and home. That’s where my first job at Papa John’s came in.

 Weekends and holidays often brought in hectic evenings with backed-up orders. Even though I loved my co-workers, there were points during those evenings where I just wanted to slam down the phone and walk out. What kept me there was the thought of having my very own car.

 Jobs get stressful. When you start, you are anxious and insecure; when you move up in rank, the pressure and workload intensifies. No matter your position in a company, you will get stressed and will have an urge to quit.

If you leave every time something becomes difficult, imagine how that will appear on your résumé.

 As Amy Brownstein, founder and president of Brownstein Public Relations, said, “If you keep quitting your jobs, all you will have are lots of little assignments on the résumé and nothing of any value. It simply means you tried to attack and chip at the tip of the iceberg and failed to see the foundation and unmovable strength that lay beneath.”

 My current job is at Valdosta Catering. A handful of other students started at the same time as I did and every one of them has left. The job was more demanding and tiring than they were expecting.

 With the instability of the job market now, I knew I could not afford to leave; I knew it was better to stay. I have been with the company for a year now.

Barry Paschal, publisher of The Columbia County News-Times, told me working and going to school will cause you to stand out to future employers. It demonstrates you have discipline and work ethic. If you keep quitting every job you have now, it will reflect on you poorly in the future.

 A job will not always provide the greatest source of enjoyment. When you first start anywhere, you are the newbie. You will mess up many times and be jittery with nerves. You will have horrible days that will push your limits. With any bad day comes a good one, and the good ones force you to stay.

 Certain circumstances compel you to resign. If you are miserable and can not find a reason to stay, think before you quit. If you have plenty of savings, then you might survive financially; however, keep in mind the situation of the current job market. Even with savings, it might be in your best interest to stay. If you are quitting because of your boss, focus in on the company of your co-workers. If you are leaving because the work is simply too hard, stick it out; not everything is easy.

 Quitting can leave a mark on your job portfolio. Make sure before you turn in your two weeks notice you have no other option.

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